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Circular Reference

Circular reference occurs in Excel when you set up a formula that includes itself in the formula. A simple example is when you create a SUM formula in D10 trying to add up D5 to D10. In this case, D10 is trying to add to itself. It is easy to detect circular reference in your own worksheet because Excel prompts you immediately when a circular reference is created. You can check on the last formula and remove the circular instantly. The real problem occurs when users don't read the error message carefully when it pops up and continues to work with a worksheet containing circular reference which causes some valid calculations to fail. To find out how circular reference in a workbook is created, refer to our Applied Excel website.


Maximise Use of Wage Credit Scheme with No Surprises!

"I have increased my staff pay by at least $50 per month. But why am I not getting the 40% rebate from the Wage Credit Scheme offered by IRAS?"

We are anticipating this reaction at the end of the year for those who are looking forward to some savings in manpower cost. At the same time, some companies are still exploring how they can take advantage of the Wage Credit Scheme without upsetting their foreign workers who are equally valuable to them. These two problems can in fact be resolved at the same time if you have a better understanding of the Wage Credit Scheme. We have created an Excel template to help you better manage the Wage Credit Scheme so that you do not receive any surprises at the end of the year.

We are organizing an Excel Tips and Tricks session on 23 May 2013. So far those who have responded are mainly from HR, hence we would like to take the opportunity to share more about the Wage Credit Scheme and how to make full advantage of the Wage Credit Scheme without suffering a major spike in cost after 3 years when the Wage Credit Scheme is withdrawn.

If you have not signed up for the Excel Tips and Tricks session on 23 May 2013, you can sign up now through this linkSeats are limited.

Ask us an Excel question and get your question answered by our team of Excel experts

Question:

I am working on a spreadsheet with regards to construction, I have a start date say 1 July with a duration of 10 days to carry out the works, therefore we need to complete 10% per day. I have a summary progress chart that will record the % completed, however i need to calculate the planned %, so my problem is how do i link the start date to the summary and get the same to calculate the same on a daily bases, ie today's planned is 10% and every day thereafter the planned % needs to increase by the daily planed % 

Click on this link to find the answer.


Upcoming Courses

With the newly introduced PIC bonus, you are now paid (not paying) 60% of the course fees for sending your staff to our courses. Check out now in this IRAS PIC Link.

Hidden Secrets in Data Analysis with Excel 2007/2010 - 5 & 6 Jun 2013 

Dynamic Real-Time Forecasting with Excel 2007/2010 - 27 & 28 May 2013 

Learning the Magic of Macros 2007 (Excel VBA) - 15 & 16 Jul 2013 

Breakthrough Performance for HR in Excel 2007/2010 - 29 & 30 Aug 2013 

Interactive Dashboard Reporting with Excel 2007/2010 - 25 & 26 Jul 2013

For the details of the courses, please refer to our Excel courses page.


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Yours Sincerely,

Jason Khoo
Chief Trainer
everydayExcel Business Lab Pte Ltd
Author of "Hidden Secrets of Data Analysis with Excel" and 
"Excel Secrets for Highly Effective Marketers"

 

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